Master’s student Pavarin Bhandtivej seeks to bring data to bear on policymaking in Thailand.

Through MIT’s master’s program in data, economics, and development policy, Pavarin Bhandtivej seeks to bring data to bear on policymaking in Thailand. Image: Allegra Boverman

Hannah Meiseles | MIT News correspondent

Thailand has become an economic leader in Southeast Asia in recent decades, but while the country has rapidly industrialized, many Thai citizens have been left behind. As a child growing up in Bangkok, Pavarin Bhandtivej would watch the news and wonder why families in the nearby countryside had next to nothing. He aspired to become a policy researcher and create beneficial change.

But Bhandtivej knew his goal wouldn’t be easy. He was born with a visual impairment, making it challenging…


Grants also focus on developing teacher capacity in the US and Argentina

Children graphing out data points at a school work table
Children graphing out data points at a school work table

By MIT J-WEL

J-WEL has announced the most recent round of pK-12 education innovation grants, which further J-WEL’s commitment to generate innovative approaches to reaching marginalized learners and to providing capacity-building experiences for educators. The grants focus on a number of countries around the world, including Argentina, Greece, Indonesia, and India, with three focused on the U.S.

Five of the seven awards announced will support efforts to reach underserved learners, including efforts to partner with rural and tribal public libraries in the U.S., …


From Ethiopia to community college to MIT, Mussie Demisse ’21 is on a mission to use his love of learning to solve big problems.

Man with arms outstretched in front of the Charles River.
Man with arms outstretched in front of the Charles River.
“I began to grasp the importance of knowing more than just the facts,” says Mussie Demisse of the journey that led him to study at MIT after discovering OpenCourseWare. Courtesy of Mussie Demisse.

By Duyen Nguyen

Minutes before finding out he’d been accepted to MIT, Mussie Demisse ’21 was shaking Governor Charlie Baker’s hand. Demisse was at an awards ceremony at the Massachusetts State House, being honored as one of the 2018 “29 Who Shine,” a select group of graduates from the Commonwealth’s higher education system who’d made an impact at their institution and in the community. For Demisse, Bunker Hill Community College, where he’d spent the previous two years studying computer science, represented both. …


The ability to globally transfer educational credentials digitally benefits both learners and employers, provided GDPR and online safety are kept paramount. How can this be achieved? TU Delft has been testing the possibilities and the results are encouraging.

Woman’s hand holding phone
Woman’s hand holding phone

Digital Credential Consortium/TU Delft

As a pre-millennium student and or professional, you probably remember how proudly you received your educational achievements (degrees and the occasional certificate) and carefully put these away in a file to avoid creases (perhaps some of you showcased your degree on the wall). However, for most of us from that period, we most likely didn’t pick up those files again except occasionally to photocopy or scan our educational track records for a new employer.

Fast forward to today — if you are a lifelong learner, that bulky file gathering dust is now most likely a digital…


Inge Gedo believes in transforming learning for all students

Four views of MIT Full STEAM Ahead activities. Top left: a woman with a large stack of boxes; top right: a woman holding up a book; bottom left: a Zoom meeting; bottom right: a stack of books and microbits in boxes
Four views of MIT Full STEAM Ahead activities. Top left: a woman with a large stack of boxes; top right: a woman holding up a book; bottom left: a Zoom meeting; bottom right: a stack of books and microbits in boxes
Courtesy of MIT Full STEAM Ahead.

By Duyen Nguyen | MIT Open Learning

“I firmly believe that every student needs strong STEM foundations regardless of their passion or future career goals because this world will only become [more] dependent on advances in STEM fields.”

Since graduating from the MIT School of Humanities, Arts & Social Sciences, Inge Gedo, Course 21S, HU and SCI (German & Biology) ’85 has had a diverse and rewarding career — first in the United States Air Force and now as an educator teaching STEM and language classes for the Fairfax County Public Schools in Virginia. Her background spans from biology to…


MIT Physics instructor develops alternative forms of assessment to better suit a variety of remote learning experiences

Woman drawing figures on a light board while lecturing on physics.
Woman drawing figures on a light board while lecturing on physics.
Dr. Michelle Tomasik lectures on angular velocity for MIT OpenCourseWare. Tomasik recently gave an xTalk on alternative forms of assessment that better gauge student progress in a remote learning environment. Image credit: MIT OpenCourseWare.

The widespread adoption of online learning — both in response to the pandemic and as an emergent component of higher education — presents opportunities to transform assessment approaches.

For students learning remotely, unequal technology resources, incompatible time zones, and competition for quiet learning spaces can be stressful and negatively impact all aspects of learning: studying, attending classes, and preparing for and taking exams.

In response, MIT Physics instructor Dr. Michelle Tomasik was inspired to create alternative assessments and assignments that are better-suited for remote learning. She shared her experiences in a recent xTalk (Jan 14, 2021).

Three recommendations for designing…


23 instructors recognized for extraordinary online teaching with annual student-nominated award

Flowering tree with MIT Great dome in background
Flowering tree with MIT Great dome in background

This June, 23 faculty and instructors from a dozen departments, labs, and centers across MIT were honored with Teaching with Digital Technology Awards in an online celebration hosted by the Office of Open Learning.

Established in 2016 and co-sponsored by Open Learning and the Office of the Vice Chancellor, these awards were originally intended primarily as a means of recognizing innovative use of digital technologies in the context of MIT’s in-person, on-campus classes. …


Two women engineers working in a foundry
Two women engineers working in a foundry

June 23 is International Women in Engineering Day! To celebrate, we’ve put together a list of just a few of the teaching and learning resources you can access to tap into the wisdom of some of MIT’s remarkable women engineers:

Dig into MIT OpenCourseWare Materials:

Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Properties of Materials with Polina Anikeeva

Freshman Seminar: The Nature of Engineering with Lorna Gibson

History of Women in Science and Engineering with Maia Weinstock

Integrated Chemical Engineering Topics I: Introduction to Biocatalysis with Kristala L. Jones Prather

Introduction to Biological Engineering Design with Natalie Kuldell

Mechanics & Materials I with Carol Livermore, Simona Socrate, and…


24-Week Course, Launching June 30, Provides Personalized Training for the Four Million-Plus Unfilled Cybersecurity Jobs Globally

3D rendering of activated white and blue firewall, overlaid on image of server room data center
3D rendering of activated white and blue firewall, overlaid on image of server room data center
Credit: Scedcoret

With ransomware, malware, phishing and other cyber-attacks threatening the security of companies, government entities, and organizations across the globe, a timely new Professional Certificate in Cybersecurity will launch on June 30 from MIT xPRO. The intensive 24-week online learning program, delivered through Emeritus, trains professionals to mitigate and combat digital security threats, and builds upon recognized security principles from the National Institute of Standards & Technology (NIST).

Led by eight faculty from MIT’s Sloan School of Management and its Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), the new MIT xPro Cybersecurity course will begin with a study of baseline fundamentals…


MIT instructors honored for creating multidimensional, multidisciplinary online courses that help learners everywhere address real-world problems.

Professional headshots of 5 men and 1 woman
Professional headshots of 5 men and 1 woman
The 2021 MITx Prize winners (clockwise from top left): professors Jonathan Gruber, Andrew Lo, and Harvey Lodish; alumnus Shomesh Chaudhuri ’14, ’18; and graduate students Kate Koch and Zied Ben Chaouch.

MIT Open Learning

On May 14, six MIT instructors were honored with the 2021 MITx Prize for Teaching and Learning in MOOCs. The prize, established in 2016, honors excellence in creating Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) for MITx on edX. Anyone in the MIT community can submit nominations, including MITx MOOC creators, and awardees are selected by the MITx Faculty Advisory Committee.

The award was given to two courses this year, honoring faculty and instructors from four disciplines. Jonathan Gruber, Ford Professor of Economics, was honored for his 14.01x (AP Microeconomics) course, which uses MIT materials geared toward high school…

MIT Open Learning

Transforming teaching and learning at MIT and around the globe through the innovative use of digital technologies.

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store